Get Engage{d}

Are you Engage{d}

Will Republicans Have a Primary to Replace C.W. Bill Young?

In the final days before the filing deadline, Republicans remain unsure whether lobbyist David Jolly has cleared the GOP field in the competitive special election to succeed the late Rep. C.W. Bill Young, R-Fla.

In recent days, state Rep. Kathleen Peters expressed interest in running for the St. Petersburg-based district, and she has yet to back off.

Democrats cleared the field early for former state Chief Financial Officer Alex Sink, who is all but certain to win the party’s nod on Jan. 14. Republicans rivals to Jolly have talked about running, but all of them have declined bids so far.

Except for Peters.

“From day one, we have been running as if we will be having an opponent for the primary and are moving full speed ahead,” Jolly spokeswoman Sarah Bascom said in a Friday interview with CQ Roll Call.

A Thursday phone message seeking comment from Peters’ office was not returned.

Many people who matter in the region’s GOP politics — donors, elected officials and Young’s widow — quickly lined up behind Jolly after he announced his candidacy two weeks ago.

Read More on Roll Call: Will Republicans Have a Primary to Replace C.W. Bill Young?

The 39 House Democrats Who Defied Obama’s Veto Threat

Updated 4:04 p.m. | President Barack Obama vowed to veto legislation that would let insurers keep selling old policies to new customers, as well as revive them for existing customers for another year, but 39 Democrats defied him and their party leadership Friday and voted for the bill.

All but three of the Democratic members on the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee’s Frontline incumbent protection program voted with Upton and the GOP — Ann Kirkpatrick of Arizona, Lois Capps of California and John F. Tierney of Massachusetts.

But Kirkpatrick wasn’t exactly aligning herself with the president, either, issuing a blistering statement after the vote.

“The stunning ineptitude of the ACA marketplace rollout is more than a public relations disaster,” she said. “It is a disaster for the working families in my Arizona district who badly need quality, affordable health care.”

Read More on Roll Call: The 39 House Democrats Who Defied Obama’s Veto Threat

Military Sexual-Assault Bills Touch Raw Political Nerve for Democrats

Democrats seem to agree on the need to address the rising number of sexual assaults in the military, but the intraparty battle over the issue has gotten deeply personal and could end up politically damaging to those who have been tagged as “anti-victim.”

Democratic leaders are dreading having what is likely to be an emotionally charged fight play out on the Senate floor when the chamber takes up the Defense authorization bill in the next few weeks.

“I would be less than candid if I didn’t say this has been — for somebody who has fought and has a long history of victim advocacy, from my days as a state legislator to my days as a prosecutor to establishing laws and programs and fighting for victims all my life — that it’s been very difficult to be characterized as anti-victim,” Sen. Claire McCaskill told CQ Roll Call.

The Missouri Democrat has been one of the lead supporters of keeping sexual-assault cases within the military’s chain of command while making other key changes aimed at addressing the issue. On the other side, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., has been aggressively pushing to take commanders out of the mix when it comes to sexual-assault allegations.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., has been coy about his plans to proceed on competing proposals to curb what has become a crisis in the armed forces. While most of his caucus members support Gillibrand’s framework, at least a dozen Democrats likely will vote for the Senate Armed Services Committee markup language being championed by McCaskill.

Read More on Roll Call: Military Sexual-Assault Bills Touch Raw Political Nerve for Democrats

Wash. Legislature Will Reconvene to Vote on Boeing Construction Package

Avi Niman of StateTrack reports that Washington Gov. Jay Inslee (D) has called a special session of the state’s legislature, to convene Nov. 7. Lawmakers will consider approving a package of legislation that will enable the construction of the new 777X jetliner by The Boeing Company in Everett, Wash.

The proposed package includes tax incentives, education and workforce development, a transportation revenue package, streamlined permitting, and water quality solutions. Inslee has stated that ratification of this legislative package is crucial for the economic growth and development of jobs in the state.

Keep Reading…